cost-optimisation

DAY 5 – Packaging Tip No5 – Manufacturing constraints

Posted in Design, Machinery, Opinion, Top 10 Tips, Uncategorized, cost-optimisation on March 10th, 2010 by Chris Penfold – 4 Comments
Packaging Top Ten Tips

Packaging Top Ten Tips

In order to help you develop your packaging more productively, we have generated a series of  FREE short 1-2 minute videos detailing our Tip Ten Tips for getting it right. We will be posting 1 x video per day on this blog site over a 10 day period – so keep a look out for them – they could save you a £££$$$ fortune in the long run!

DAY 5 – Tip No5: Have you thought about how your pack is going to be filled or assembled? If by hand initially, what about longer term? Thinking ahead could save you a lot of time & expense…have a look at the video…

Tickety Boo packaging.

Cheers Chris

Today’s Video:

Packaging Tip No5 – Manufacturing & Production constraints – by Chris Penfold – Design Cognition

Look out tomorrow for Tip No 6 – Environment & sustainability…..

DAY 2 – Packaging Tip No2 – ensuring it is ‘fit for purpose’

Posted in Design, Materials, Opinion, Top 10 Tips, Uncategorized, cost-optimisation on March 5th, 2010 by Chris Penfold – 6 Comments
Packaging Top 10 Tips

Packaging Top 10 Tips

In order to help you develop your packaging more productively, we have generated a series of  FREE short 1-2 minute videos detailing our Tip Ten Tips for getting it right. We will be posting 1 x video per day on this blog site over a 10 day period – so keep a look out for them – they could save you a £££$$$ fortune in the long run!

DAY 2 – Tip No2: What you want is packaging that is ‘fit for purpose’ don’t you? That performs all of the roles that it needs to, whilst conveying your brand values.  So where do you start? Click on the link below to go to the video to find out.

Happy Packaging. Cheers Chris

Today’s Video:

Packaging Tip No2 – Keeping it simple & fit for purpose – by Chris Penfold – Design Cognition

Look out Monday for Tip No 3 – market positioning & branding…..

P&G implement ‘world class’ artwork & packaging processes

Posted in Business News, Cosmetics & Toiletries, Innovation, Opinion, Technology, cost-optimisation on February 17th, 2010 by Chris Penfold – 3 Comments

The following initiative by Proctor & Gamble sounds like a great means to “drive scale, improve R&D productivity and accelerate the delivery of new products to market”. Integrating the virtual and digital design capabilities and virtual test capabilities of future packaging and artwork projects in an integrated manner makes sense, should elevate P&G from ‘best-in-class’ for ’stand alone’ systems to ‘world-class’ global integrated solution – but easier said than done.

A range of P&G FMCG products

A range of P&G FMCG products

Implementing enterprise-wide product life-cycle management processes on this scale is a mammoth task. However, by taking a stepwise approach, planned properly as part of an e-Business strategy (dovetailed within an overall corporate strategy) P&Gs chance of success will be much greater. Identification of any barriers (cultural or otherwise) and development / implementation of a ‘game plan’ to deal with these will raise the chances of success even higher. Chris Penfold

P&G Incorporates Global Packaging and Artwork initiatives

Procter & Gamble (Cincinnati, Ohio) is extending the scope of its V6 PLM implementation to incorporate global packaging and artwork initiatives with the help of Dassault Systemes (France). This builds on the previously announced strategic selection of DS solutions for an enterprise-wide product life-cycle management process. Together, Dassault Systemes and P&G are developing a highly integrated suite of products to help make the packaging process more efficient, improve speed to market, increase shelf impact, and ultimately create a better experience for consumers. Streamlining these services is another example of how DS is supporting P&G’s focus on “Simplify, Scale & Execute” which is one of the company’s key growth strategies.

“As P&G continues to serve more consumers, in more parts of the world, more completely, it is essential we have the right tools in place to drive greater efficiency,” says Michael Telljohann, PLM director, P&G. “To address these opportunities as they arise, it’s imperative that mission critical business processes like artwork and packaging move from a series of best-in-class point solutions to enterprise-wide integrated solutions. Dassault Systèmes’ suite of V6 PLM products will help P&G drive scale, improve R&D productivity and accelerate the delivery of new products to market.”

Via http://PMPNews.com 17th Feb 2010.

You can read the full article by clicking: P&G PLM implementation article

Increasing legislation v reducing pack sizes – the labelling dilemma!

Posted in Branding, Cosmetics & Toiletries, Design, Drinks Packaging, Environmental Issues, Food Packaging, Gift Packaging, Healthcare & Pharma, Innovation, Legal, Marketing, Opinion, Technology, Uncategorized, cost-optimisation on January 4th, 2010 by Chris Penfold – 5 Comments

The normal packaging development  process would involve firstly developing a pack to fit the product in an optimum manner. Then any legally required text would be positioned (including any required symbols, such as recycling logos). Finally the marketing requirements would be implemented, in terms of claims, branding etc. More often than not, there is then a need to go back to product marketers to get them to reduce their marketing copy on the packs, because it simply won’t fit……..and the situation is getting worse!

Other options that can help tackle this problem are:

A, reducing the font size – but this can have implications on readability, print process constraints and there is often a legal minimum size which needs to be adhered to.

B, Using paginated label leaflet formats – where, on occasions, we have developed up to a 10-page concertina style leaflets. However, these multi-layered add-ons can add a huge on-cost onto the price of a pack – for which marketers don’t always want to pay.

C, Printing on the inside of pack (e.g. cartons) – but not visible until a pack is opened. So one can’t do this with certain text which needs to be visible at time of purchase

D, Finally, if all else fails, considering increasing the overall size of the packaging.

An example of a multi-page label solution

An example of a multi-page label solution

This latter route is sometimes unavoidable, especially with pharmaceutical packs, where the packs are very small, and even after taking measures such as reducing the bar codes from 13 digit to 8 digit, there is simply not enough room to display the mandatory legal minimum required text (let alone any marketing text).

Furthermore, it is now the law for any new medicines to incorporate Braille on the packaging (it will be a requirement for all existing medicines by October 2010). This will have to detail the product name, the strength [of the medication] and the dose form – yet another constraint to bear in mind. New products also have to conform with the readability guidelines which are in place to ensure that the packs can be read clearly and understood by the patient/consumer).

It’s worth remembering that it’s not just the basic information that one has to put on the pack. Very this has to be repeated it in a number of  different languages. It’s not unusual for a European product to have a need for 12 languages. And then there might be a need to repeat ‘country of origin’ for every language, and could require five countries needing to be listed (for a range of ingredients). The result could be a situation where  all one has room to display is a list of ingredients  & addresses, and any wish for aesthetic beauty just ‘goes out of the window’.

At Design Cognition, we review the whole space to find an ideal design that looks most aesthetically appealing and hopefully doesn’t look too cluttered – but it’s not always easy!

Incorporating logos of different colours, or trying to mix varying colours of text with backgrounds, can add its own issues and problems. Sometimes ‘house colours’ do not lend themselves to readability, White text on a pastel or black background for instance, can be even harder to read, so we may need to redesign [the pack graphics], using the principles and processes detailed above.

Overall our job is to develop a pack that is fit for purpose and not over-packaged. Things are becoming increasingly challenging but, so far our use of creativity and lateral thinking has provided a suitable solution.

Moving forwards technology could aid some of the issues raised above. Nowadays, certain consumer/marketing information can be shown ‘on-line’, cutting down the need to put it all on-pack – maybe just a web address for further information. There have also been great leaps forward in microchip technology which will enable ‘talking packs’, ‘moving pictures’ and a whole new interactive consumer experience – taking packaging to a new level. These are all areas in which Design Cognition has a strong interest and is working with a number of suppliers to develop cost-effective solutions.

If you’d like more information on these areas, sign up for further information HERE

Chris Penfold

Chartered Environmentalist + WRAP Technical Advisors x 2 = Good News

Posted in Associations, Awards, Design, Design Cognition News, Drinks Packaging, Environmental Issues, Food Packaging, Gift Packaging, Healthcare & Pharma, Opinion, Recycling, cost-optimisation on December 14th, 2009 by Chris Penfold – 17 Comments

Just a quick note to confirm that both Annie and myself have been honoured with the title of Chartered Environmentalist (CEnv) by the Society for the Environment, through our membership of the Institute of Materials, Minerals & Mining (IOM3) and because of our life-long commitment to developing sustainable packaging solutions in our day-to-day projects. It’s nice to have it recognised and, by implication, recognition of the fact that packaging actually provides a beneficial (environmental) role in society.

This also sits nicely with our appointment last year as Technical Advisors to WRAP (the UK government-run Waste Resources & Action Programme) in ‘Waste Minimisation – Packaging Product Waste’. I feel that a key component of this has been our understanding of the requirements of present environmental legislation, in particular the Producer Responsibility Obligations (Packaging waste) and Packaging (Essential Requirements) Regulations, which have been key in a number of recent environmental & sustainability assessments

‘Sustainable development’ to me is all about taking a ‘helicopter’ view of any product development to understand:

  • environmental impacts throughout the whole supply chain (from raw material extraction, through use & disposal, to reuse and recovery) whilst
  • attempting to meet consumer convenience needs,
  • BUT minimising the overall environmental impact through intelligent design of pack (primary, secondary & tertiary), using the optimum material specifications & most economical footprint possible.

I believe that key to our CEnv award was our continued application of the principles of sustainable environmental management and development in our work. Over my 30 year career ‘the environment’ has become ever-more prominent on everybody’s agenda, evolving from the early days of the ‘Topfer Decree’ to the more recent ‘Plan A’. We have endeavoured throughout to apply the principles of sustainable environmental management and development in all of our work as ‘environmental packaging champions’:

  • Acting as an internal consultants for marketers & other business stakeholders – advising on ‘fitness for purpose’ and ‘environmental best-practice’.
  • Highlighting issues with existing packaging to our work colleagues
  • Applying ‘sustainable principles in the hundreds of packaging developments on which We’ve worked

Moving forwards, I pledge that Design Cognition will continue applying the principles of sustainable development and environmental responsibility in all of our work. As CEO of a company that not only develops packaging but also acts in a consultancy capacity (advising on packaging ‘sustainability’ & ‘the environment’) I carry the mantle with a great deal of pride and self-fulfilment – enjoying making a ‘real difference’ in the world.

  • Our initial discussions with clients always encompass sustainable aspects – and that will continue
  • One of our ‘values’ (shown on our website) is to be ‘environmentally aware’:
  • “bearing in mind our impact on the environment and eco-systems in all that we develop and in our day-to-day business”
  • Through this ethos I will encourage all in Design Cognition to ‘live’ our environmental policy as a holistic approach to encompass not only work we do for clients but also in our day-to-day business activities.

We look forward to working with you :-)

Chris

Advent Calendar – humorous variation – Move over Cadbury’s!

Posted in Design, Drinks Packaging, Environmental Issues, Gift Packaging, Innovation, Opinion, Recycling, cost-optimisation on December 10th, 2009 by Chris Penfold – 6 Comments

We just received this picture via email and it made us laugh. We thought that you might like it too.  A very novel re-use of packaging to minimise scarce resources. Have a guess from which northern UK country it originated? Chris

tennants image001_1

Novel re-use for Tennants Lager packaging

Biggest limiting factor to innovation in pharma packaging industry?

Posted in Business News, Categories, Design, Healthcare & Pharma, Innovation, Technology, Uncategorized, cost-optimisation on December 8th, 2009 by Chris Penfold – 9 Comments

I found the following article via a LinkedIn packaging group and it gives an interesting overview of size, trends, obstacles, opportunities and predictions pharma packaging industry. Have a read of the full article and let us know what you think. Chris

Vials and syringesAccording to a survey conducted by Pharmaceutical Technology Europe (PTE), almost 50% of you believe that cost is the biggest limiting factor to innovation in the pharmaceutical packaging industry, while regulations were also thought to present a major hurdle to new development, accounting for almost two-thirds of the remaining votes.1 The pharmaceutical industry recognizes the importance of good packaging design, in particular because of the continuing pressure to aid patient compliance, meet regulatory demands, and increase a brand’s life and appeal; however, manufacturers must also innovate while improving efficiency and adapting to the growing threat of drug counterfeiting.

You can read the full article here (but may need a LinkedIn account):

http://fb.me/3mDlBhX

Via LinkedIn link to Pharmaceutical Technology Europe, Volume 21, Issue 11 Nov 1, 2009
Article by: Fedra PavlouStephanie SuttonCorrine Lawrence